How to check your pulse (heart rate)

What is your pulse?

When your heart beats it pushes blood around your body. This heart beat can be felt as your ‘pulse’ on your wrist or neck.

Your pulse is measured by counting the number of times your heart beats in one minute. For example, if your heart contracts 72 times in one minute, your pulse would be 72 beats per minute (bpm). This is also called your heart rate.

A normal pulse beats in a steady, regular rhythm. However, in some people this rhythm is uneven, or ‘jumps about’. This is known as an irregular pulse.

How do you find your pulse?

The easiest place to find your pulse is in your wrist.

Turn your hand so that your palm is facing upwards. Now place the three middle fingers from your other hand over your wrist below the base of your thumb. Press lightly to feel the pulse under your fingers. If you can’t feel anything press slightly harder.

How do you check your pulse (heart rate)?

You can measure your heart rate manually by checking your pulse. Follow these three steps.

  • Find your pulse in your wrist (as explained above)
  • Count each beat for a total time of 30 seconds
  • Double the number of beats you counted. This is your heart rate or pulse, measured in beats per minute.
Source: HEART FOUNDATION (New Zealand)

Also make a note of whether your heart beats at an even or uneven rhythm. A normal heart beats at a steady rhythm like a clock, tick tock tick tock.

Some people like to use a heart rate monitor to measure their heart rate. These monitors are often included in fitness trackers, which are now widely available in sports stores and other retail outlets. However, their accuracy depends on the quality of the device.

What is a normal heart rate?

A normal heart rate, when you’re not being active, is between 60 – 100 bpm. This is called your resting heart rate. If you’ve been active, you’ll need to wait at least five minutes before taking your pulse.

When you’re active, your heart beats faster to get more oxygen to your working muscles. The harder your body is working, the faster your heart will beat. For example, your heart rate when you’re sprinting will be much faster than your heart rate when you’re walking. If you’re exercising hard it’s normal for your heart rate to get up to 160 beats per minute or more.

There are other things that can make your heart beat faster, like caffeine, nicotine, recreational drugs and some kinds of medications. Your heart will also beat faster when you feel strong emotions, like anxiety or fear.

Athletes or people who are very fit may have resting heart beats of less than 60 bpm.

What is an irregular pulse?

An irregular pulse is when the heart doesn’t beat in a regular, steady rhythm. This is also called an irregular heart rate or an arrhythmia.

If your heart rate is irregular, you may notice that your pulse:

  • seems irregular or is ‘jumping around’
  • is racing, even when you’re at rest
  • seems unusually slow some or most of the time.

Why is it important to get it checked?

Often an irregular pulse is harmless. However, it’s important to get it checked by a health professional, because sometimes it’s a sign of a heart condition.

The most common kind of heart rhythm condition is atrial fibrillation (AF), which can put you at greater risk of having a stroke. Fortunately, if you have AF, there’s medication you can take to help reduce this stroke risk.

Your doctor can do a simple test called an ECG (electrocardiogram) to further check your irregular pulse.

What are heart palpitations?

A heart palpitation is when you suddenly become aware of your heart beating, usually in an irregular way. Sometimes you can feel it in your ears or your chest when you’re lying down. Your heart beat may feel:

  • too fast or slow
  • like it’s fluttering
  • like it’s thudding, or pounding.

It is not unusual to feel heart palpitations occasionally and mostly they are harmless. However, if you’re experiencing them on a regular basis, see your doctor.

Exercise and heart rate

Like any other muscle, your heart needs exercise to keep it fit and healthy. Regular exercise can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health conditions, such as diabetes.

To keep your heart healthy, you should aim to do 150 minutes of low to moderate intensity exercise a week. If you have a heart condition, talk to your doctor about what exercise and target heart rates are safe for you.

One way to measure the intensity of your exercise is by using your heart rate. To exercise at a low to moderate intensity your heart rate should be at 50 to 70% of your approximate maximum heart rate.

The easiest way to get an approximate maximum heart rate (MHR) is to calculate 220 – your age. You then need to calculate 50 to 70% of your MHR.

For example, if you’re 40-years-old:

  • your approximate maximum heart rate: 220 – 40 = 180 beats per minute
  • 50% of your MHR: 180 x 0.5 = 90 bpm
  • 70% of your MHF: 180 x 0.7 = 126 bpm.

Alternatively, you can use our heart rate chart below to get a rough idea.

Heart rate zones chart: Estimated heart rates for exercising

AgeApproximate maximum heart rate (MHR) (unit: bpm)Target heart rate for low to moderate intensity exercise
(50 – 70% of maximum for MHR) (unit: bpm)
20200100 – 140
3019095 – 133
4018090 – 126
5017085 – 119
6016080 – 112
7015075 – 105
8014070 – 98
9013065 – 91

Remember if you’re on medications to slow your heart rate down, you may not be able to meet these upper heart rates and the aim should be to exercise at a rate that makes you lightly puff.

Source: HEART FOUNDATION (New Zealand)

About STELLA

Stellapharm is one of leading generics pharmaceutical companies and strong producer of anti-viral drugs in Vietnam. The company established in Vietnam in 2000; and focuses on both prescription drugs and non-prescription especially in cardiovascular diseases, antiviral drugs, anti-diabetics drugs, etc. and our products are now used by millions of patients in more than 50 countries worldwide.

The company is globally recognized for its quality through our facilities have been audited and approved by stringent authority like EMA, PMDA, Taiwan GMP, local WHO and others.

Additional information for this article: Stellapharm J.V. Co., Ltd. – Branch 1
A: 40 Tu Do Avenue, Vietnam – Singapore Industrial Park, An Phu Ward, Thuan An City, Binh Duong Province, Vietnam
T: +84 274 376 7470 | F: +84 274 376 7469 | E: info@stellapharm.com | W: www.stellapharm.com

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