Top 10 safety tips when using topical medicines

Most people wouldn’t think twice about applying over-the-counter (OTC) creams, lotions, ointments, gels, sprays, or patches to the skin. However, the medicines in these products can enter the body just like medicines taken by mouth.

Although harm does not happen often, when using topical medicines applied to the skin, be sure to follow the directions and heed any warnings found on the Drug Facts label on all OTC medicines. Below are 10 tips when using topical medicines.

Source: NPS Medicinewise

1. Don’t apply topical pain relievers onto damaged or irritated skin.

2. Don’t apply bandages to the area where you’ve applied a topical muscle and joint pain reliever.

3. Don’t apply heat to the area in the form of heating pads, hot water bottles or lamps. Doing so increases the risk of serious burns and also absorbing too much drug.

4. Don’t apply plastic wrap over any of these products, unless told to do so by your doctor, as this also increases heat and drug absorption.

5. Don’t allow these products to come in contact with the eyes and mucous membranes (such as the skin inside your nose, mouth, or genitals).

6. It’s normal for products for muscle pain to produce a warming or cooling sensation where you’ve applied them. But if you feel actual pain after applying them, look for signs of blistering or burning. If you see any of these signs, stop using the product and seek medical attention.

7.  Use the medicine exactly as stated on the label, or exactly as your doctor told you. Don’t use more of the medicine than prescribed, and do not use it more often or longer than recommended.

8. Apply creams, ointments, gels, and sprays sparingly and only on the areas needed, not all over your body. More medicine can be absorbed from around skin areas that rub together, like under the breasts or between the buttocks, so apply very sparingly to these areas.

9. Since some cosmetic procedures may be performed without a medical doctor present (e.g., laser hair removal), consider having a pharmacist or doctor first review any creams or ointments you are instructed to apply to the skin.

10. Talk to a pharmacist when buying prescription and OTC creams, ointments, sprays, gels, and patches, so you use the products safely. Learn what side effects are possible and what to do about them if they happen.

Source: CONSUMERMEDSAFETY.ORG

About STELLA

Stellapharm is one of leading generics pharmaceutical companies and strong producer of anti-viral drugs in Vietnam. The company established in Vietnam in 2000; and focuses on both prescription drugs and non-prescription especially in cardiovascular diseases, antiviral drugs, anti-diabetics drugs, etc. and our products are now used by millions of patients in more than 50 countries worldwide.

The company is globally recognized for its quality through our facilities have been audited and approved by stringent authority like EMA, PMDA, Taiwan GMP, local WHO and others.

Additional information for this article: Stellapharm J.V. Co., Ltd. – Branch 1
A: 40 Tu Do Avenue, Vietnam – Singapore Industrial Park, An Phu Ward, Thuan An City, Binh Duong Province, Vietnam
T: +84 274 376 7470 | F: +84 274 376 7469 | E: info@stellapharm.com | W: www.stellapharm.com

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